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To drive and maintain high quality CX business leaders must orchestrate capabilities & skills from inside & outside the organisation.

Customer experience (CX) can make or break a business today. Its strategic value means CX is no longer the responsibility of a single role or department. The whole organisation: front, middle and back office, must be aligned to a common ‘customer’ purpose.

To achieve this, you need to take a multi-dimensional approach to how you plan, design and deliver CX. It means bringing together diverse internal and external teams that can uncover deep customer insights, re-orient business processes around those needs and quickly build dynamic applications that respond to them.

The leaders in CX will successfully integrate these different perspectives to deliver amazing experiences that drive customer loyalty and sustained growth.

REPORT

Bridge the gap between CX promise and reality

Are brands living up to their customer experience promises?

We surveyed businesses and their customers to find out whether brands are meeting customer demands and delivering an experience that matters.

Read now to understand the CX gaps that exist and learn how to close them.

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CX50

Welcome to CX50

An independent list curated in collaboration with Marketing Week to introduce the thought-leaders, opinion-formers and practitioners who are creating the customer experience economy.

See below the first 10 out of 50 nominated individuals.

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  • Alessandra Bellini

    Alessandra Bellini

    Chief customer officer
    Tesco

    Once the retailer by which all others were judged, a number of missteps saw Tesco’s fortunes fall a few years ago. Alessandra Bellini is in charge of reversing that trend.

    An experienced FMCG marketer with two decades at Unilever, Bellini has an instinctive feel for what makes customers respond to brands – and what drives them away. Since her appointment in 2017 she has undertaken a complete overhaul of the company’s messaging as well as its own-brand positioning. But above all, Tesco will have to live the values she is bestowing on it:
    “We always say you don’t talk yourself out of a problem, you behave yourself out."

  • Anna Bateson

    Anna Bateson

    Chief customer officer
    The Guardian

    When newsprint brands are suffering at the expense of their digital counterparts, it helps to get inside knowledge on board. In a ‘poacher turned gamekeeper’ turnabout, former Google and YouTube marketer Anna Bateson joined Guardian News and Media (GNM) as its first chief customer officer in 2017.

    Bateson hasn’t so much switched sides as become the glue that brings them together. Her role is to manage partnerships with Google and Facebook as well as oversee events, brand, syndication, subscriptions and all Guardian marketing.

    She’s already seeing the fruits of the new reader-centric policy that encourages them to become ‘supporters’ by making voluntary payments, and has stewarded a radical redesign of the newspaper and website. Revenues are up 1% with digital up 15%, overtaking print for the first time.

  • Dave Clark

    Dave Clark

    SVP worldwide operations
    Amazon 

    With 20 years’ service in the Amazon machine, Dave Clark has witnessed every transformation from the day it branched out beyond books to its status as the behemoth marketplace we see today. It recently recorded record quarterly profits of $2.53bn (£1.9bn).

    With his LinkedIn CV at the company beginning from a role based “wherever I was needed10”, Clark now heads up the retailer’s global supply chain and logistics. In today’s environment of incredibly high customer expectations, this is a field that may not receive the plaudits and attention of other business functions, but which is clearly crucial to delivering consistent customer experiences.

    “In the next 10 to 20 years, businesses will be driven by experts in the supply chain because of technology revolutionising the way customers are served11,” says Clark.

I-L

  • Kerris Bright

    Kerris Bright

    Chief customer officer
    BBC

    If anyone can get inside the mind of the consumer, it’s Kerris Bright. With a PhD in molecular neuroscience, Bright is captivated by knowing what makespeople tick. Marrying an analytical mind with creative flair, this former British Airways and Virgin Media marketer is now getting personal at the BBC.

    She is charged with driving increased personalisation for BBC audiences, which is no mean feat considering the broadcasting institution reaches just under 400 million people worldwide. In this drive towards a more personal, customisable BBC, Bright oversees both the marketing and audiences function and the licence fee unit, while also playing her part in driving strategy as an executive board member.

  • Lara Burns

    Lara Burns

    Chief digital and technology officer
    Age UK

    One of 2018’s top 100 CIOs, Lara Burns has a track record for bringing traditional organisations to the forefront of technological innovation. At the Royal Horticultural Society she managed the 15-strong digital team behind the Grow Your Own iPhone app, which was downloaded more than 300,000 times in its first year.

    For Age UK her challenge has been to digitise the charity’s approach while maximising its financial resources. Burns has been behind award-winning initiatives such as the Call In Time befriending service and works closely with CAST, the Centre for Acceleration of Social Technology, to reach the 4.5m older people who have yet to gain digital access to age-related support services.

Q-T

  • Sarah Barron

    Sarah Barron

    Chief marketing officer
    Costa Coffee 

    You’d be hard-pressed to find a CMO remit as broad as Sarah Barron’s. Since 2016, the former Cadbury marketer has been responsible for global marketing and brand strategy across more than 30 markets from the UK to China.

    Then there’s managing the global brand equity; leading global innovation and add in supervising the digital customer experience, not forgetting store format and design development. All this, and she is a member of the executive board too. With more than 2,400 stores plus licensed coffee products, continued international expansion and new corporate owners in Coca-Cola, that to-do list won’t be getting shorter any time soon.

  • Sarah Bentley

    Sarah Bentley

    Chief customer officer
    Severn Trent

    If the chief customer role can be described as all-encompassing, Sarah Bentley stretches that to the very limit. As CCO of Severn Trent, her job description covers retail P&L and group CIO, as well as the small matter of heading up group transformation.

    She would describe her remit as customer advocate and change agent, and is thankful to have such a wide-ranging remit. Bentley claims it helps her push for and prove change more effectively than her CCO peers, who are left trying to influence rather than take direct action. Her push towards technology-driven transformation and a keen focus on what customers want (“cheaper bills, not marketing3”) underpins the utility’s strong annual results.

  • Tom Blomfield

    Tom Blomfield

    CEO
    Monzo Bank

    To be called the future of banking at the ripe old age of 32 isn’t bad going, but then, Tom Blomfield isn’t one for following convention. Not many financiers start out selling bits and bobs on Hong Kong street corners.

    But it’s this sort of initiative-taking that has helped him create a banking brand for the next generation that has investors falling over themselves to take a slice of the pie.

    His trajectory hasn’t been without its hiccups – some stints in staid consultancy and the odd false-start startup. But, like the lurid yet eminently recognisable Monzo bank cards, the Blomfield future’s bright.

  • Tom Broughton

    Tom Broughton

    Founder
    Cubitts

    Despite the fact that Tom Broughton himself claims to have a “very emotional6” relationship with ‘face furniture’, his reasons for launching eyewear brand Cubitts are wholly practical.

    Firstly, more than two-thirds of the UK population wear glasses. Secondly, they will
    always need to buy at least one more pair. And lastly, he determined the customer experience was “shit”, so he decided to do something about it.

    After launching in 2012 at his kitchen table and opening his first retail outlet in 2014,the company doubled in size every year to 2017 and has gone from one employee to more than 40.

Y-Z

  • Zoe Burns-Shore

    Zoe Burns-Shore

    Chief customer officer
    Yorkshire Water

    For a former agency executive, now a board-level marketer, Burns-Shore isn’t afraid of going off-script. Before her recent move to Yorkshire Water, she spent nearly six years at First Direct - famously market-leading on customer service. Yet Burns-Shore insisted that neither customer-centricity nor being mobile-first were plaudits the brand aspired to hang its hat on.

    “Good customer service comes with the territory – it’s just something people expect,” she argues. As the quintessential challenger bank marked its 30th birthday, facing a glut of new entrants to the market, Burns-Shore was still encouraging it to keep pushing boundaries, challenging the challengers.

    At Yorkshire Water, Burns-Shore will be leading enterprise-wide customer experience strategy and delivery.

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Alessandra Bellini

Chief customer officer
Tesco

Once the retailer by which all others were judged, a number of missteps saw Tesco’s fortunes fall a few years ago. Alessandra Bellini is in charge of reversing that trend.

An experienced FMCG marketer with two decades at Unilever, Bellini has an instinctive feel for what makes customers respond to brands – and what drives them away. Since her appointment in 2017 she has undertaken a complete overhaul of the company’s messaging as well as its own-brand positioning. But above all, Tesco will have to live the values she is bestowing on it:
“We always say you don’t talk yourself out of a problem, you behave yourself out."

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