Agile teams focus corporate firepower

Nearly half of respondents (49%) expect flexible and multi-disciplinary teams to emerge as a lasting impact from the pandemic (see Figure 2, page 5).

In this work model, agile processes are executed by networks of teams, operating in a work culture characterized by flatter management styles and more autonomy rather than departmentalized structures that are bureaucratic and slow to change. Rapid learning and fast decision cycles are enabled by a strong IT foundation and a common purpose of co-creating value for stakeholders. For example, during the pandemic, we witnessed the rise of public-private alliances between governments, regulators, life sciences companies, healthcare providers, startups and scientists, all coalescing in an attempt to find effective treatments and, ultimately, a vaccine.

Agile organizations emulate the speed, dynamism and customer centricity that distinguish digitally native competitors that can pivot just as quickly as customer needs do.

What it means

Agile organizations emulate the speed, dynamism and customer centricity that distinguish digitally native competitors that can pivot just as quickly as customer needs do. These businesses empower teams to swarm around specific challenges. For example, instead of concentrating technology professionals in a centralized IT department, leaders will embed software designers and engineers in independent teams, where they can be quickly and easily deployed on high-priority goals.

Expect to see multi-disciplinary teams emerge across functional departments. These teams will comprise a diverse mix of expertise drawn across functional boundaries: Product and marketing specialists will work alongside commercial experts, data scientists and UX specialists on a common strategic goal or aligned with a customer journey.

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